[BLOG]: Are you sure you want that Solid State Drive (SSD)? - Tech blog

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[BLOG]: Are you sure you want that Solid State Drive (SSD)? - Tech blog

Unread postby HalloweenWeed » Mon Feb 08, 2010 8:37 pm

This is a blog post. To read the original post, please click here »

Solid State drives (SSDs) are one of the hottest things on the market right now in computer land. They have some advantages - and some disadvantages, the biggest one being price per gigabyte. I'm not going to get into all that here, anyone can google about it to understand that. What I'm going to discuss is some of the things that consumer's don't know about them may bite them later. This blog is not intended for the tech geeks, but for the average Joe who wants a new computer or hard drive. First, SSDs are much faster than conventional Hard Drives (HDs or HDDs) out of the box. But what a lot of people don't know is without the TRIM feature the SSDs can become much slower when written to as they age. I don't want to get into too much particulars about this, as you can google TRIM or look it up on Wikipedia and find out the specifics yourself. But for those who haven't, you should know this when buying your next computer. Many people are paying a lot more for SSDs nowadays than for HDDs, on the premise that they are faster. But when all the bits are written to once, if TRIM is not in use they will slow down significantly when writing info to the SSD. One need not 'fill' the HDD for it to reach this point. How soon will this happen? It depends on how much info you store on it, and how often it changes. If you have Windows and the Windows swap file (you need not know this detail) on the SSD, then it will happen much sooner than if you only are using your SSD for your data files. If you have only 1 HDD, and it is an SSD, then this is the case for you. If you have the SSD nearly filled, over 70%, then it will also happen much sooner.

What's more, not all SSDs have TRIM support. I for one was bit by this a couple of months ago. I thought "I am buying this from a major high-end memory manufacturer, and TRIM has been around for nearly a year, so surely they support it." But NO! Their website pages on my (newer) model did not even mention TRIM anywhere. I decided that a Velociraptor® would be faster or nearly as fast in the long run, and is quite a bit cheaper per gigabyte (although I have heard they only last about 2 years). So also, make sure your SSD model supports TRIM. If it don't say so, assume it doesn't, or wait for a response from the manufacturer after you ask them about it.

TRIM is integrated into Windows 7, but you need to install it on previous or other operating systems (OS). But what a lot of people don't know is that TRIM does not work on RAID arrays. If you don't know what a RAID array is, then you need not worry about it, provided you don't get SSDs in a RAID array. If your order doesn't say so, your system most likely will not have a RAID array. But for those who do, you may experience a noticeable slowdown as your drives age. This may be weeks, or years, depending on usage. I haven't been able to find any studies yet that gauge just how much the SSDs in RAID slow down as this becomes an issue, but it may be enough to negate most of the advantages of the SSDs (considering the price)! The point of this paragraph is if you are wanting a RAID array, then you might just want to get conventional drives instead.

-HalloweenWeed

Tags: HDD, RAID, raptor, solid-state drive, SSD, Tech blog, Technology blog, TRIM, Velociraptor
Posted under: Science and Technology
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Re: [BLOG]: Are you sure you want that Solid State Drive (SSD)? - Tech blog

Unread postby LeeShane » Sun Dec 05, 2010 11:57 am

Most SSDs use NAND-based Flash memory, which keep hold of memory even devoid of power. SSDs using unstable random-access memory (RAM) also exist for state of affairs which require even quicker access, but do not essentially need data perseverance after power loss, or use batteries to back up the data after power is removed. A hybrid drive joins the features of an HDD and an SSD in one unit.
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Re: [BLOG]: Are you sure you want that Solid State Drive (SSD)? - Tech blog

Unread postby HalloweenWeed » Mon Dec 06, 2010 5:06 am

Actually this OP blog is somewhat obsolete now, as Garbage Collection (GC) routines - sometimes built-in - have improved in both usage and implementation categories; though there is still good info there. Newer SSDs (this year) are much better aging, for the most part, than previous year SSDs.
"Religion is just mind control." "Atheism is a non-prophet organization." - George Carlin
"If God existed, why would he care about any of the us fools contributing to the end of the earth as we know it?" - HalloweenWeed
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