Megaupload takedown

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Megaupload takedown

Unread postby UnwantedSunbeam » Wed Apr 18, 2012 9:28 pm

This was a recent post on Forbes:

The internet is up in arms over the federal crackdown of file-sharing website Megaupload, from irate blog posts to coordinated digital attacks on secure government servers. The move appeared to be a sort of governmental muscle flexing in the wake of the successful internet protest of SOPA and PIPA. But was there another reason? In the weeks before the crackdown, Megaupload was planning on launching a new music sharing website called Megabox that looked like it had the potential to completely transform music distribution, and even find a way to pay musicians in the process.

From TorrentFreak, via Digital Music News:

“UMG [Universal Music Group] knows that we are going to compete with them via our own music venture called Megabox.com, a site that will soon allow artists to sell their creations directly to consumers while allowing artists to keep 90 percent of earnings,” said MegaUpload founder Kim dotcom.

“We have a solution called the Megakey that will allow artists to earn income from users who download music for free,” Dotcom said. “Yes that’s right, we will pay artists even for free downloads. The Megakey business model has been tested with over a million users and it works.”

This smacks a little of conspiracy theory, but there may be some truth to the timing. MegaUpload no doubt looked like a good target for FBI attention even before this new development, considering it was prime hacker territory and its founder was living like a Colombian drug lord in New Zealand. But the timing seems a little serendipitous, especially since MegaUpload had even begun to acquire legitimate partners in the form of 7digital, Gracenote, Rovi and Amazon.

But while some might have been able to see this coming, Kim Dotcom doesn’t seem to have.
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Re: Megaupload takedown

Unread postby UnwantedSunbeam » Fri Mar 15, 2013 3:28 pm

Mega Upload is back. This time it is encrypted to Mr Dotcom cannot be implicated anyone shares copyright material.

My question is has Kim Dotcom done a deal with the man to get out of jail? IP address capture and content tracing back to the user?

I think the problem with our modern world is that business has taken over a resource for information sharing and tried to make it a market place.
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Re: Megaupload takedown

Unread postby HalloweenWeed » Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:12 am

UnwantedSunbeam wrote:I think the problem with our modern world is that business has taken over a resource for information sharing and tried to make it a market place.


Now you're talking, USb. Yes, the problem stems from a few problem points. First, the judges are usually old and have little idea how the Internet is currently being used. They are all previous lawyers and thus they don't do much browsing, nor conversing on forums. The computer is for word processing, background checks (of people, things, and Co's) and searching for cases, to them. Sure they know it is useful for CAD/CAM/CAE, and science. But to them "normal everyday" people (peasants) are just wasting their time on it - and they don't care about their Internet problems.

Next, there are scant few people who "champion" for the open free Internet. And of those, some are bought by their nemesis, you know, those payoffs where they are sworn to keep quiet - like a lawsuit settlement. It takes big $$ to make a serious judgement happen regarding the Internet, and so it is the big Corp's that win the Internet law battles. But I am preaching to the choir, right? You already know this, just didn't say it.


The third point is it's hard to make laws about the Internet, as laws need to be specific or they have no 'teeth.' But since the Internet is growing and changing so fast, the laws cannot keep up, and often they end up doing as much damage as good in the end because of unforseen advances.


Yes, it's a sad state of affairs. Personally, I'm finding it harder and harder to Internet search, as I get all these false-positives for:

* Other search sites pretending to search for what I searched for, particularly the ones that don't have any real results - and some of them are just ads keyed to your keywords.
* Other sites pretending to sell what I am looking for but in reality are just other search engines finding less results.
* Sites that claim to be reviewing a product, when in fact they are just giving a compendium of some search results using the product name - and some of those plagerize other reviews and quote them - picking out only certain reviews or giving only a portion of the text. This is particularly hard to decipher in the search results as the short preview of the reviews look genuine.
* Sites that pretend to be the target, only to 'refer' you to them if you respond. There are several Internet real-life 'services' services that do this, like "Service Network" for instance (there are ones that sound less obvious). You search for an electrician, they give you an ad that looks like the genuine IRL brick-and-mortar article, but when you call them they say they can put you in touch with them! Then they charge the service company for every call they put through - inflating your costs. For instance, you search for Jim Brown plumbing in Yournearbytown. You see an ad, looks like it could be the one. You call them, they say something like 'yes, this is their call service, we can put you in touch with them, just a moment... A minute later, they say he's not answering, can we put you in touch with Joe Shmoe Plumbing instead? When all you wanted was to call Jim Brown plumbing. Even if you only get their answering machine. Is that so hard? Telephone books were easier!
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"If God existed, why would he care about any of the us fools contributing to the end of the earth as we know it?" - HalloweenWeed
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Re: Megaupload takedown

Unread postby UnwantedSunbeam » Fri Mar 29, 2013 4:43 pm

You are correct HW, I think the rate of change is much to slow to cope with the mutation/evolution of the internet. Laws and law makers are notoriously slow, and I think the current approach of trying to make physical world rules applicable to the online world is woeful.

That said there needs to be regulation for the reasons you listed in your post, spoof and spam sites are the worst, they are the online version of the man in the alley with the mac on; "Psssssst wanna good plumber - buddy?".

My biggest fear is that we are slowly having our ability to choose removed, for instance how many times do you go onto page 3 of a search engine result set. Perhaps I am just a little old fashioned, I like being able to walk around 20 shops before making my choice. Modern commerce seems to want me to search, take the first result, buy and wait for delivery.
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